Subscribe to Canada Free Press for FREE

Made in China Export, "Killer Super bugs"

Ugly and painful sores result of prolonged severe antibiotic abuse in Red China


By —— Bio and Archives--January 10, 2008

Comments | Print Friendly | Subscribe | Email Us

ugly soresThe so-called “Killer Super bugs” now stalking world hospitals is yet another `Made in China’ export.

“On December 19, 2007 the Health Department of Hong Kong Government acknowledged that reported cases of community super bug infection have increased to 175 cases with 2 deaths for the year ending 10/31/2007 and about 10% came from massage salons in Hong Kong and Mainland China.” (Next Magazine, #930, Jan. 3, 2008).  “The super bug (antibiotic resistant Staph Aureus bacteria) may cause fatal disease with 50% mortality.”

While a lack of common sense in hygiene is a problem, the abuse of antibiotics for decades in China may well be the root for the case for the super bugs to have become somewhat “rampant” recently in the West, a result of increased to-and-fro contacts with Communist Chinese who do not keep proper medical records.

  Even though the CDP said back in 2003 that they would ban the use of antibiotics without prescription, it was four decades to late.  As reported by the Next Magazine, by mid-2007, antibiotics are freely available in large quantity without prescription at any drug store in Communist China.

  In China, patients often attempt to treat themselves with antibiotics before going to hospital.  Chinese doctors have long been aware of the massive abuse of antibiotics and the danger of resistance, but are possibly guilty of contributing to it by administering antibiotic by drip on demand—even for known viral illnesses such as flu.

  In Britain, doctors have been told to stop prescribing antibiotics for coughs, colds and sore throats because over use of the drugs is fuelling the spread of killer hospital super bugs.

  “Alan Johnson, the Health Secretary, says it is time to end the unnecessary use of penicillin and other commonly-prescribed pills, which cost the NHS £1.7 billion a year. ( www.telegraph.co.uk, Jan. 10, 2008.)  “Using antibiotics too liberally has led to bugs such as MRSA becoming resistant to treatment with the drugs.  Most colds, coughs and flu are caused by viruses, which cannot be treated with antibiotics anyway, Mr. Johnson points out.”

  British hospitals will be cleaning house.

  Announcing a £270 million campaign against super bugs, to be launched next month, Johnson says it is vital that doctors adopt “less of a knee-jerk reaction to prescribing”.

  The campaign, called Clean, Safe Care, will also include an extra 45 million for hospitals to spend on infection control nurses or antibiotic specialist pharmacists.  All patents going into British hospitals will be screened for MRSA by 2009.

  Staff have already been told they must be “bare below the elbows” to help prevent the spread of infection between patients and all hospitals should undergo a “deep clean” by March this year, although experts have dismissed this as a gimmick.

  “The past 60 years have seen great advances in health care and medicine.  For example, the use of antibiotics has saved countless lives, but antibiotics do not work on most coughs, colds and sore throats and their unnecessary use can leave the body susceptible to gut infections like Clostridium difficile.” says Mr. Johnson.

  Over-use of antibiotics, which can be used only on bacterial infections, has been blamed for the rise of drug-resistant tuberculosis.  The drugs can strip natural bacteria from the gut and allow C.diff to take hold and kill vulnerable elderly people.

  Too-liberal use of antibiotics, especially when patients do not finish their courses, allows multiplication of bugs that have mutated to become resistant.

  Every year, 80,000 Chinese die from antibiotics abuse, making China one of the worst offenders in the world.

  “Statistics show that among the country’s 15 best-selling medicines, 10 are antibiotics.  More than 50 per cent of the medical expenses for Chinese in-patients goes to cover different kinds of antibiotics, while the figure in Western countries is just 15 to 30 per cent.” (Shanghai Star, Dec. 18, 2003).  “Many Chinese believe the myth that antibiotics can diminish inflammation, so they use them to treat everything from toothache to fever.” 

  Oceans and borders have not stopped the steady march of the killer super bugs.

  One hundred people have died from super bug infections in just one hospital in Quebec over the last 18 months, says a hospital infectious disease expert. (Newstarget Aug. 2004) Fifty-four people died in the hospital last year, and so far this year the death toll has already reached 46.

  Meanwhile, adding to the nightmarish theme of killer super bugs on the loose in hospitals worldwide, ugly and painful sores from prolonged severe antibiotic abuse are showing up on patients in Red China.

  End Time advocates will undoubtedly speculate about the “ugly and painful sores that broke out on the people who had the mark of the beast” (Rev. 16:2) and how the sores will soon manifest themselves in the West if the West continues to kowtow to the CCP (kowtow is to receive the mark) which fits into every description of the 666 beast given in the second part of Revelation 13.


Judi McLeod -- Bio and Archives | Comments

Copyright © Canada Free Press

RSS Feed for Judi McLeod
Judi McLeod is an award-winning journalist with 30 years’ experience in the print media. A former Toronto Sun columnist, she also worked for the Kingston Whig Standard. Her work has appeared on Rush Limbaugh, Newsmax.com, Drudge Report, Foxnews.com.

Older articles by Judi McLeod

Commenting Policy

Please adhere to our commenting policy to avoid being banned. As a privately owned website, we reserve the right to remove any comment and ban any user at any time.

Comments that contain spam, advertising, vulgarity, threats of violence, racism, anti-Semitism, or personal or abusive attacks on other users may be removed and result in a ban.
-- Follow these instructions on registering: