Canadian News, Politics, Opinion

WhatFinger

Major tax, labour and energy reforms needed to make Ontario competitive and open for business

TORONTO—Ontario’s new provincial government has pledged to make Ontario “open for business,” but doing so will require significant reforms on taxes, electricity pricing and labour regulation, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“There’s no silver bullet for the wide range of problems facing Ontario, and making the province competitive again will require big changes on many different policy fronts,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute senior fellow for Ontario prosperity studies and editor of Creating policy calling cards to attract business to Ontario.



By Fraser Institute - Wednesday, September 19, 2018

Manitoba needs to cancel its corporate welfare credit card

Manitoba needs to cancel its corporate welfare credit card
Like an overly enthusiastic shopper with a maxed-out credit card, the Manitoba government is on a corporate welfare spending spree that it simply can’t afford.

Premier Brian Pallister just stopped by a new Canada Goose facility in Winnipeg with a gift of almost $1.5 million in taxpayers’ money. The government says money will support the “onboarding and technical training of the new sewing machine operators.” In other words, Manitoba taxpayers are paying Canada Goose $1.5 million to hire people to sew thousand-dollar luxury coats.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation - Tuesday, September 18, 2018

Ford Strikes a Blow Finally Against Unelected Elitist Lawmaking Liberal Judges

Ford Strikes a Blow Finally Against Unelected Elitist Lawmaking Liberal Judges
Ontario Premier Doug Ford’s decision to invoke section 33 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, (Charter) the “notwithstanding clause”, is a declaration of war on out of control, unelected, unaccountable, rogue liberal activist judges who have misused, misapplied and distorted the Charter to make law on the fly, for their own ideological+ partisan personal purposes. This is Ford’s first shot across the bow of these liberal judicial pirates who have high-jacked our democratically elected (by the people) legislatures.  But it will not be his last during his term of office.

By Mitch Wolfe - Monday, September 17, 2018

Government efforts have failed to Stimulate the Economy

Government efforts have failed to Stimulate the Economy
OTTAWA, ON  With persistent uncertainty plaguing business investment and consumer confidence, economic growth in Canada has been sputtering. Now, to make matters worse, the federal government is facing new economic challenges including faltering infrastructure spending, ongoing NAFTA disputes with the US, and the court ruling which has blocked the Trans Mountain Pipeline.

By Macdonald Laurier Institute - Thursday, September 13, 2018

Growth rate of capital investment in Canada hits 40-year low

Growth rate of capital investment in Canada hits 40-year low
VANCOUVER—The growth rate of capital investment in Canada—particularly in the important areas of equipment, machinery and intellectual property—has slowed to a 40-year low, negatively affecting living standards for workers and overall economic growth, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, September 13, 2018

CANADA POISED FOR A SLUGGISH END TO 2018: MLI’S LEADING ECONOMIC INDICATOR

Leading Economic Indicator
OTTAWA, ON—The Macdonald-Laurier Institute’s Leading Economic Indicator (LEI), a tool designed to predict changes in the Canadian business cycle, increased by 0.1 percent in July. This represents a continuation of the slow growth that it has posted over the last four months.

While six of the ten components of the LEI underwent relatively marginal changes, the overall weakness in the index was primarily driven by declines in the housing and consumer confidence components.

By Macdonald Laurier Institute - Tuesday, September 11, 2018

Getting the Trans Mountain expansion back on track

Getting the Trans Mountain expansion back on track
For Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, the Federal Court of Appeal’s recent decision to overturn approval of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion was a political thunderbolt that instantly derailed progress on one of his government’s most critical files. Luckily for the purveyor of sunny ways, the storm clouds came with a silver lining: a careful reading of the decision also offers some guidance on how his government can get Trans Mountain back on track.

There have been no shortage of twists and turns on the pipeline front for Trudeau. Having directly or indirectly killed off alternative pipeline proposals and under immense pressure to get one built, he proceeded to buy a way out of the problem, and in so doing shifted the project’s risks from Kinder Morgan shareholders onto the backs of Canadian taxpayers.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, Federal Director- Monday, September 10, 2018

Refresh the national shipbuilding strategy? Yes, please

Refresh the national shipbuilding strategy
In June 2010, the Stephen Harper government announced the long-awaited National Shipbuilding Procurement Strategy for the Royal Canadian Navy and Canadian Coast Guard. It was a $38-billion strategy to commission up to 28 vessels from two Canadian shipyards—Seaspan in Vancouver and Halifax-based Irving Shipbuilding.

Unfortunately, as is so often the case with government strategies, things haven’t gone according to plan. By 2017, the Parliamentary Budget Office had estimated the cost of the shipbuilding program had leapt to at least $62 billion with further increases expected as projects get pushed farther off into the future, all while our navy languishes without re-supply and refuelling capabilities.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, Federal Director- Saturday, September 8, 2018


The Left Hates Tubes

The Left Hates Tubes
“Why a ban on plastic straws sucks” – Maclean’s, May 13.

“The pessimists have it right, assassins are gunning for Trans Mountain [Pipeline].” – Financial Post, August 31.

“If cars and trains and planes could run on green sanctimony, in the age of Justin Trudeau, Canada would be Kuwait.” – Rex Murphy, National Post, September 1.

The issue of virtue fronting malevolence could use a full page. However, today’s crisis is a policy failure that goes back to May of 2016 when the National Energy Board recommended that the Trudeau government approve the Trans Mountain expansion. New to office, Trudeau wanted to dither with regulatory requirements.

By Bob Hoye - Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Canada Needs a True Conservative Party

Canada Needs a True Conservative Party
A couple of weeks ago, CPC MP Maxime Bernier held a press conference hours before the party’s 2018 convention was to begin in Halifax. Bernier not only announced he was quitting the party but he was going to start his own.

While the Quebec MP was always a thorn in the side of the Conservative Party of Canada, the writing was on the wall in mid-August when he sent out a series of tweets. Bernier criticized Trudeau’s “cult of diversity” and “extreme multiculturalism.” And he made the politically incorrect statement people who do not accept Western values and have no intention of integrating into Canadian society should not be allowed to immigrate here. These are statements the CPC would never dare make. (Spencer Fernando, Aug. 12)

By Arthur Weinreb - Tuesday, September 4, 2018

Hey Trudeau- Make the NAFTA deal now!

Hey Trudeau- Make the NAFTA deal now!
Trump is not the bully here. Stop blaming Trump for being Trump and standing up for America’s interests. That is what American presidents do. The problem lies once again with Trudeau’s arrogance and incompetence. The delay in Canada reaching a NAFTA deal with the U.S. and the foreseeable imposition of U.S. steel and aluminum tariffs on Canada is all Trudeau’s fault. Trudeau could have avoided this situation months ago

Our best loss (and smallest loss) on the NAFTA negotiations was our first loss. Months ago Trudeau should have taken a hit on NAFTA but agreed to a NAFTA skinny deal giving Trump the victory over some minor matters. But Trudeau wasted valuable months talking about and promoting gender, climate change and aboriginal matters.  These matters were quite irrelevant issues to the core issues at play.

By Mitch Wolfe - Thursday, August 30, 2018

Ontario’s labour market among worst in North America

Ontario’s labour market among worst in North America
TORONTO—Ontario’s labour market performance—which includes the province’s job-creation record and unemployment rate—ranks among the worst in North America when compared to other Canadian provinces and U.S. states, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“With Labour Day around the corner, now is an opportune time to assess how well Ontario’s labour market stacks up against other Canadian and American jurisdictions,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute senior fellow.

By Fraser Institute - Thursday, August 30, 2018

80% of government employees have guaranteed pensions compared to just 10% of private sector workers

Labour Day Reality Check
OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) today released an analysis of federal pensions based on data compiled by Statistics Canada, which shows that risky defined-benefit pensions are vanishing in the private sector, but remain overwhelmingly common within government.

“This data provides support for a widespread sentiment: that government employees get very risky, very generous pensions, paid for by people without pensions,” said CTF Federal Director Aaron Wudrick. “Government employee unions like to crow about their success in cajoling government into enriching their members – but always avoid mentioning it comes at the expense of Canadian taxpayers.”

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, Federal Director- Wednesday, August 29, 2018

Ottawa’s drug-pricing changes threaten Canadians who suffer from rare diseases

Ottawa’s drug-pricing changes threaten Canadians who suffer from rare diseases
TORONTO—The federal government’s plan to increasingly regulate the costs of pharmaceuticals could mean Canadians with cystic fibrosis and other rare diseases may soon lose access to new innovative drug treatments, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

Starting next year, the Patented Medicine Prices Review Board (PMPRB)—a federal body that regulates the prices of all patented medicines in Canada—is planning to use new rules for establishing drug prices with the goal of lowering costs.

By Fraser Institute - Tuesday, August 28, 2018

Trudeau Just Killed the Quebec Liberals’ 2018 Election

During a recent speech in Saint-Jean-sur- Richelieu Prime Minister Trudeau publicly verbally bashed an elderly female Quebec senior. This brave woman had the temerity to ask Trudeau, when will his government pay back the $146 million dollars of Quebec taxpayer money that have been incurred to support Trudeau’s illegal immigrants who have entered Quebec illegally across the Quebec border from the United States.

Trudeau’s public shaming of this French Canadian woman and the physical manhandling of this senior citizen by Trudeau’s security detail ( see RCMP plainclothes goons), were all captured on video, distributed on Twitter and covered extensively by the Quebec mainstream press.  The result.  Trudeau’s actions have driven the final nail in the Quebec Liberals’ chances for re-election in this upcoming October 1 provincial election.



By Mitch Wolfe - Monday, August 27, 2018

Time to investigate the gravity of scandalous waste

Time to investigate the gravity of scandalous waste,
Keeyask is one of the Hydro projects with a cost that’s grown massively and is now expected to come in $4.2 billion over the initial projection.Handout/Manitoba Hydro

It’s funny to wonder how many apples fell on heads before one sparked Isaac Newton’s curiosity about gravity.

Here’s a less humorous question: when will a Manitoba scandal spark the curiosity of a provincial politician?

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Todd MacKay – CTF Prairie Director- Friday, August 24, 2018

Truckers getting carbon tax ticket while big emitters get a pass

The carbon tax must be making Manitoba truckers feel like they’re getting pulled over and fined, even though they’re just doing their jobs, while corporate-types race by and get a friendly wave from government.

The unfairness of a carbon tax is becoming clear. Families are wondering why they’ll be punished for filling up their run-of-the-mill minivans when hybrid equivalents are unaffordable at twice the price. Small businesses are wondering why they’ll be pushed for heating with natural gas when Manitoba Hydro’s electricity rates are rising indefinitely. But truckers provide a particularly poignant example of unfairness.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Todd MacKay – CTF Prairie Director- Thursday, August 23, 2018

Six reforms that would improve accountability in Ontario politics

Something needs to be done to repair the breach of trust between Ontario’s citizens and our political leaders. The new Ford government should take tangible steps early in their mandate to restore public trust. Accountability reforms are best made in the early days of a government, when idealism is high, and self-interest low (or at least lower). Here are six accountability reforms that the new Ford government should implement:

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Christine Van Geyn, CTF Ontario Director- Thursday, August 23, 2018

Energy Independence | Pierre Poilievre



Justin Trudeau talks a big game about standing up to foreign governments—I take a closer look in our newest video.

By News on the Net - Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Taxpayers Federation granted leave to intervene in court battle over size of Toronto city council

Taxpayers Federation granted leave to intervene in court battle over size of Toronto city council,
TORONTO, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) has won the right to stand up for taxpayers in the court fight to reduce the size and cost of Toronto city hall.

The Ontario Superior Court granted the CTF leave to intervene and present arguments in Achampong v Ontario. In this case, Rocco Achampong, a candidate in the 2018 municipal election, is challenging The Better Local Government Act, which reduces the size of Toronto city council from a planned 47 wards to 25 wards.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Christine Van Geyn, CTF Ontario Director- Wednesday, August 22, 2018

Ontario can balance budget while also cutting taxes

Ontario can balance budget while also cutting taxes
TORONTO—Ontario’s new provincial government can balance the budget and even cut taxes, but it will require a focus on spending discipline, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“While Ontario’s deficit will likely be much larger than originally projected, the province needs to reduce and reform its tax system to make the province more competitive,” said Ben Eisen, Fraser Institute senior fellow and co-author of Restoring Ontario’s Public Finances.

By Fraser Institute - Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Distrust of Police Growing in Canada

Distrust of Police Growing in Canada
No, it’s not the progressives. Many on the left are true cop-haters from the get go. A prime example of how the left detest police (unless they become victims of a crime and squeal like the cowards they are) occurred during the recent Ontario election campaign. Gurrant Singh, brother of federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, was a star candidate for the NDP. It was revealed he once carried a sign in a demonstration that read “F**K the POLICE.” Ontario NDP leader Andrea Horwath saw nothing wrong with that. Neither did the rest of her radical caucus.

Now the increased skepticism about the men and women in blue is coming from the right; those who traditionally support the police and law and order. A recent example of this occurred during and after the mass shooting on Toronto’s Danforth Avenue.

By Arthur Weinreb - Sunday, August 19, 2018

Canada doesn’t need a death tax

Canada doesn't need a death tax
These are challenging times for the Canadian economy. An unpredictable president to the south has contributed to uncertainty around NAFTA, while American business tax cuts have erased Canada’s longstanding competitive tax advantage as we struggle to attract foreign investment.

Even the Justin Trudeau government, which as recently as its spring budget was content to pretend all was well, finally seems to be acknowledging there’s actually a problem that needs to be tackled.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, Federal Director- Thursday, August 16, 2018

The average Canadian family paid $37,058 in taxes last year—more than housing, food and clothi

VANCOUVER—The average Canadian family spent 43 per cent of its income on taxes in 2017, more than housing, food and clothing costs combined, finds a new study released today by the Fraser Institute, an independent, non-partisan Canadian public policy think-tank.

“Many Canadians will be surprised to learn that taxes—and not life’s basic necessities, including housing—is the biggest household expense,” said Charles Lammam, director of fiscal studies at the Fraser Institute and co-author of the Canadian Consumer Tax Index, which tracks the total tax bill of the average Canadian family from 1961 to 2017.



By Fraser Institute - Tuesday, August 14, 2018

Better for Ford to lower beer tax than minimum price

Better for Ford to lower beer tax than minimum price
There are few things better than a cold brew on a hot summer day, and it’s even better if you pay less for it.

Many thirsty Ontarians rejoiced recently when Ontario Premier Doug Ford announced details of his plan to get buck-a-beer into stores by Labour Day, but some brewers reacted to his plan with more tears than cheers.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Christine Van Geyn, CTF Ontario Director- Monday, August 13, 2018

Global Affairs Canada is wasting your money

Global Affairs Canada is wasting your money
Would you pay $286 for a seat cushion? How about $117 for a wine glass? Or $1,000 for a chair?

Access to information documents obtained from Global Affairs Canada by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation show Canada’s diplomats used your money to furnish embassies and consulates around the world.

Some will recall the fawning reception received by a newly elected Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the Global Affairs Ottawa headquarters in November 2015. Coming from supposedly non-partisan, neutral government employees, it raised more than a few eyebrows.

By Canadian Taxpayers Federation -- Aaron Wudrick, CTF Federal Director- Friday, August 10, 2018

Canada’s Economy to Continue Experiencing Slow Growth in 2018

Leading Economic Indicator
OTTAWA, ON The Macdonald-Laurier Institute’s Leading Economic Indicator (LEI), a tool designed to predict changes in the Canadian business cycle, increased by 0.2 percent in June. This follows two consecutive gains of 0.1 percent.

By Macdonald Laurier Institute - Friday, August 10, 2018

Elevator Nightmare in Toronto

Two men who were rescued from a flooded elevator in Toronto say they are thankful for the police officers who managed to pry the doors open just in time to save their lives.

Klever Freire and Gabriel Otrin had been working late in their office near Jane Street and St. Clair Avenue when they took the elevator down to the basement to check on Freire’s car as a rain storm pounded the city.—More…







By News on the Net - Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Securing Canada’s Border: What’s the Solution?

Securing Canada’s Border: What’s the Solution?
An Angus Reid poll released Friday shows about two thirds of Canadians feel the influx of illegal border crossers amounts to a crisis. These two thirds include people who voted NDP and Liberal in the 2015 general election. As the Liberal government is fond of noting, anyone who opposes these people walking into Canada from the United States is “alt right” and “un-Canadian.” Wonder how Liberal Party supporters who chuckle at conservatives being called names feel now. Time will tell. (Angus Reid Institute, Aug. 3)

The government’s position has been to spend money on housing and feeding these people who are called by the Liberals and their sycophants in the media as “irregular border crossers.” Some even prefer the term “refugees” although they are merely refugee claimants, a big difference.

By Arthur Weinreb - Sunday, August 5, 2018

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