Canadian Taxpayers Federation


Most Recent Articles by Canadian Taxpayers Federation:

Here’s how to balance the federal budget

Feb 16, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Here's how to balance the federal budget
During the 2015 election campaign, the Trudeau Liberal platform was clear: if elected to form a government, they would run three “modest” deficits of under $10 billion per year, with a return to balance in the fourth year.

So how have the Trudeau Liberals fared so far?

Rather than the promised “modest” deficits, they’ve run much larger ones: $17 billion for 2016-17, and $19 billion for 2017-18. In the process, they have added almost twice as much public debt as originally promised. Even worse, they have still not presented any plan whatsoever to get back to balance (although thankfully, the Department of Finance’s long-term fiscal projections show the government is still on track to balance by … 2045.)


20th annual CTF Teddy Awards for government waste

Feb 14, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

20th annual CTF Teddy Awards for government waste
OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) today held its 20th annual Teddy Waste Awards ceremony, celebrating the best of the worst in government waste from the past year. CTF Federal Director Aaron Wudrick served as host, joined by the CTF’s pig mascot Porky the Waster Hater and talented event hostess Jessica. The awards event took place on Parliament Hill in the Charles Lynch Press Theatre.

The Teddy, the pig-shaped award given annually by the CTF to government’s worst waste offenders, is named for Ted Weatherill, a former federal appointee who was fired in 1999 for submitting a panoply of dubious expense claims, including a $700 lunch for two.

“Every year, the competition is stiff, but we narrow it down to a handful of the most ridiculous stories,” said Wudrick. “Sadly, we are never short on nominees, as governments seem to be very good at finding new ways to waste money.”


Ontario PC leadership candidates sign CTF ‘No Carbon Tax’ pledge

Feb 11, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Ontario PC leadership candidates sign CTF ‘No Carbon Tax’ pledge
OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) held a press conference in Ottawa today with two Ontario PC leadership candidates; Doug Ford and Christine Elliott, and met with Caroline Mulroney on February 9.

All three candidates signed a “No Carbon Tax Pledge,” promising to repeal the Wynne cap-and-trade carbon tax, to oppose a federal carbon tax, and not to impose a provincial carbon tax if elected premier.


PCs need to dump the ‘People’s Guarantee’

Feb 8, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

PCs need to dump the 'People's Guarantee
With the departure of Patrick Brown from the PC Party, there is an opportunity for the old platform (a.k.a “The People’s Guarantee) to disappear with the old leader.

All three PC leadership candidates have indicated that they are willing to move away from the People’s Guarantee. Caroline Mulroney has said the platform is a “starting point,” while Christine Elliott qualified her support for the platform, saying she intends to run on it “for the most part.” Doug Ford has said he would change around 10 per cent of the platform.


The next Ontario PC leader has no choice but to fight carbon taxes

Feb 8, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

The next Ontario PC leader has no choice but to fight carbon taxes
The next leader of the Ontario Progressive Conservatives needs to take a page from Saskatchewan’s playbook, and be a national leader against carbon taxes.

Striking down the Wynne cap-and-trade carbon tax is an obvious start. Cap-and-trade is overly bureaucratic, sends billions of dollars out of the province, to Quebec and California, and lacks transparency as it doesn’t appear on our rising energy bills.

But Ontario families and businesses who pay for cap-and-trade deserve more than just its repeal—they deserve a commitment that the next premier will fight a deficit-laden federal government from imposing a carbon tax on us.


Time to retire pre-retirement bonuses

Feb 7, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Time to retire pre-retirement bonuses
There are some things people are generally willing to do without being paid: have a nap, eat ice cream, take a day off, etc. Most people, after decades at a good job with a generous pension, aren’t short of reasons to retire so the concept of giving employees a pre-retirement bonus is a bit odd.

For those unfamiliar with the concept of a pre-retirement bonus, the Manitoba Government and General Employees’ Union describes this benefit under the title Pre-Retirement Bonus in its collective bargaining agreement with the Winnipeg Region Health Authority.


Grassroots First Nations people need accountability protections

Feb 6, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Grassroots First Nations people need accountability protections
It’s worrying to see an old watchdog blindly wander away from its post especially when a keen-eyed replacement is kept from standing guard.

The federal government is moving to provide 10-year grants to some First Nations with little bureaucratic oversight. Essentially, Ottawa would add up the amounts due to individual First Nations for education, housing, etc., and transfer the total for the chief and council to spend as they wish. It’s an unprecedented proposal (the feds routinely pull strings on transfers to provinces), but it got little attention.


CTF releases federal pre-budget submission

Feb 1, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

CTF releases federal pre-budget submission
OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) today released its 2018 pre-budget submission to the federal government.

The CTF is calling on the Trudeau government to return to a balanced budget, pay down federal debt, abandon its ill-advised carbon tax and put an end to corporate welfare spending.

“The Liberals campaigned on ‘modest’ deficits leading to $25 billion in new debt,” said Wudrick, “Instead, we’re on track for at least $80 billion in additional debt, with absolutely no plan to get back to balance. This government needs to put forward a plan to get back to balance and start reducing the debt load on future generations.”


Mayor needs to make sure taxpayers aren’t stuck with union bills

Jan 11, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

United Fire Fighters of Winnipeg president Alex Forrest
REGINA, SK: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) is calling on the City of Winnipeg to establish a clear and firm policy to ensure that taxpayers aren’t paying the bills for unions.

“It’s bad enough to find out taxpayers are footing the bill for 60 per cent of the salary for the firefighters’ union president who is on leave from the city, but it’s even worse to find out the mayor and council didn’t even know about the one-sided deal,” said Todd MacKay, Prairie Director for the CTF. “Taxpayers shouldn’t have to cover the costs on both sides of the bargaining table – the City of Winnipeg needs to get a handle on the situation and make it clear: unions need to pay their own bills.”


Ontario wishes you a merry Christmas and a petty new tax year

Jan 4, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Ontario wishes you a merry Christmas and a petty new tax year
A new year in Ontario always comes with a few predictable staples; fireworks, champagne, a countdown to midnight, and petty increases to taxes and regulatory fees by the provincial government.

We’re not talking about big picture changes to income taxes. There is no significant change there. A two-child, single-income family earning $60,000 per year will have no change to their income taxes.


Manitobans don’t want a carbon tax

Jan 3, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Manitobans don't want a carbon tax
An Insightrix survey asked 603 Manitobans a simple question during December: Do you support or oppose a carbon tax in Manitoba? Fifty per cent oppose a carbon tax while 31 per cent support it and 19 per cent are unsure.

Here’s the reason for that opposition. A carbon tax will cost Manitobans $260 million per year, but there’s no evidence it will stop global climate change. In fact, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation analysed Manitoba’s performance on indicators cited in the province’s Climate and Green Plan. The numbers show that even without a carbon tax, Manitoba is already outperforming the nation generally and even British Columbia with its carbon tax.

Unfortunately, the province is unswayed by facts.


Trump tax cuts could spell trouble for Canada

Jan 2, 2018 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Trump tax cuts could spell trouble for Canada
Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau once remarked that Canada’s relationship with the United States was like sleeping next to an elephant: “No matter how friendly and even-tempered is the beast, one is affected by every twitch and grunt.”

Well, forget twitches and grunts. With the biggest tax cut in decades being signed into law south of the border, the elephant is about to start doing somersaults in the bed – and if our own politicians don’t take action, the Canadian economy could end up getting squashed.


CTF Releases New Year’s Tax Changes for 2018

Dec 27, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

CTF Releases New Year's Tax Changes for 2018

  • Quebec’s lowest income tax bracket drops from 16% to 15%
  • Federal small business tax rate drops to 10% from 10.5%
  • British Columbia cuts Medical Services Premium in half and hikes taxes on high income earners
  • Bracket creep remains a problem in several provinces
  •  Carbon tax hikes in Alberta, while new carbon taxes loom on the horizon nationally


OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) has released its annual report crunching the numbers on new year’s tax changes for Canadians, most of whom will only see minor changes in their tax bill for 2018.

Federally, Employment Insurance (EI) premiums will rise slightly, costing employees and employers an additional $9 and $13 per year, respectively. The indexation of the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) will also come into force on July 1, 2018, leading to a slight decrease in payments to eligible families on January 1st.


Manitobans oppose carbon taxes - survey

Dec 21, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Manitobans oppose carbon taxes - survey
WINNIPEG, MB: An Insightrix Research survey commissioned by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) shows that 50 per cent of Manitobans oppose a carbon tax and only 31 per cent are in favour.

“Premier Brian Pallister continues to ignore an obvious fact: Manitobans don’t want a carbon tax,” said Todd MacKay, Prairie Director for the CTF. “Premier Pallister’s carbon tax will cost Manitobans $260 million every year, but there’s no evidence that it will actually impact global climate change and Manitobans simply don’t support the scheme.”


Actually, Minister Joly got it right with Netflix

Dec 21, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Actually, Minister Joly got it right with Netflix
In September 2016, Heritage Minister Melanie Joly launched a review of the federal government’s cultural policies with the laudable goal of making them “better suited to today’s digital reality.”

The result, released a year later, was rather short of a revolution, including such predictable boilerplate as more taxpayers subsidies for cultural corporate welfare (also known as the Canada Media Fund (CMF)), and more tax dollars to help promote Canadian content abroad. There would even be a new Creative Industries Council, creatively created to help the creative industry counsel the government on creativity.


Mid-year budget update shows progress

Dec 21, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Mid-year budget update shows progress
WINNIPEG, MB: The Manitoba government is making progress to balance the budget with a slight decrease in the deficit and spending restraint in the wake of a dip in revenues, but more work is needed as annual interest payments are projected at $981 million.

Todd MacKay, Prairie Director for the Canadian Taxpayers Federation, will be available to comment on the mid-year budget update between 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. at the Legislature.


Eastern Ontario hospitals see climbing electricity costs

Dec 19, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Eastern Ontario hospitals see climbing electricity costs

Hospitals in eastern Ontario (including Ottawa, Napanee, Cornwall and Kingston) that have reported data show an average 28 per cent increase in electricity bills
TORONTO, ON: Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal that the electricity bills for hospitals in eastern Ontario have been increasing dramatically over the last five to six years.

Today, the Canadian Taxpayers Federation is releasing data for the Royal Mental Health centre in Ottawa, the Lennox & Addington County General Hospital in Napanee, Kingston Health Sciences, Providence Care in Kingston, and Cornwall Community Hospital.

The newly released documents show that the hospitals faced the following changes to their electricity costs:

HospitalTime Frame% ChangeTotal Increase
Royal Mental HealthCentre5 years39% increase$311,611
Lennox & Addington County General Hospital5 years33% increase$141,947
Kingston Health Sciences5 years4% decrease($154, 686)
Cornwall Community Hospital5 years4% increase$41,831

Canadian Taxpayers Federation reacts to Venture Capital Catalyst Initiative

Dec 18, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Canadian Taxpayers Federation reacts to Venture Capital Catalyst Initiative
OTTAWA, ON: The Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) Federal Director Aaron Wudrick released the following statement in response to today’s federal government announcement regarding the Venture Capital Catalyst Initiative:


Nipigon District Hospital faced with spiraling electricity costs

Dec 14, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Nipigon District Hospital faced with spiraling electricity costs
TORONTO, ON: Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal that the electricity bills for Nipigon District Hospital have been steadily climbing for five years.

The documents show bills that have grown from $195,073 in 2012 to $336,810 in 2016-17, an increase of nearly 73 per cent.


Ross Memorial Hospital in Kawartha Lakes sees dramatic increase to electricity bills

Dec 12, 2017 — Canadian Taxpayers Federation

Ross Memorial Hospital in Kawartha Lakes sees dramatic increase to electricity bills
TORONTO, ON: Documents obtained by the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) reveal that the electricity bills for Ross Memorial Hospital have faced a steep increase over the last five years

The documents show bills that are increasing, growing from $680,314 in 2012-13 to $966,032 in 2016-17, an increase of 42 per cent.

“How is Ross Memorial Hospital expected to manage their budget when electricity bills have rising dramatically every year?” asked CTF Ontario Director, Christine Van Geyn. “The more the hospital has to spend keeping their lights on, the fewer resources they have for patients.”