WhatFinger

Government Probe Signals Need to Improve Controls for Alien Removal

(The following is based on a report obtained by the National Association of Chiefs of Police.)

Officers with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) within the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) investigate violations of immigration laws and identify aliens who are removable from the United States.

By Jim Kouri - Monday, October 22, 2007

Nepotism returns to United Nations

Qualifiers bound to get you a “jammy job” at the high-handed, diplomatic immunity protected United Nations?  Other than being a bureaucrat down to the core, it helps if you are mealy-mouthed, politically correct and good at hiding when challenging times demand decisions.  Think Kofi Annan in Rwanda.

Well, as the French would say, the more things change the more things remain the same at the world’s largest bureaucracy.

Former UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan’s son, Kojo used Daddy’s name to get his green Mercedes sent back home to Ghana on the cheap, and somehow landed himself a job with a firm then connected to the Oil-for-Food scandal

By Judi McLeod - Monday, October 22, 2007


The High Cost of Climate Lies

An energy-rationing bill has been introduced to address “global warming.” The “Climate Security Act” would impose caps on how much carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions can be allowed and would institute an elaborate program to “trade” allowances among the industries and business affected.

By Alan Caruba - Monday, October 22, 2007

Why Congress is in the dump

There is a reason why 89% of the people disapprove of the job the U.S. Congress is doing.  What Congress is doing, mostly, is jockeying for political advantage.  The recent resurrection of the Armenian genocide declaration is a classic example. Why is it so important that Congress pass this resolution condemning an event that occurred in 1915 - at this particular time?

By Henry Lamb - Monday, October 22, 2007

Political gimmickery

As was pointed out in The Wall Street Journal and elsewhere, the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize was not awarded to the Burmese monks who have defied the military junta in their country and have had the whole world watching their plight. Nor to Morgan Tsvangirai and other Zimbabwe opposition leaders who were arrested and in some cases beaten by police earlier this year while protesting against the murderous policies of dictator Robert Mugabe. Nor to Father Nguyen Van Ly, a Catholic priest in Vietnam arrested this year and sentenced to eight years in prison.

By Beryl Wajsman - Monday, October 22, 2007

Quebec less tolerant than the rest of Canada

While the Bouchard-Taylor Commission was travelling the province to examine the views on Quebeckers on the “reasonable accommodation” of immigrants and ethnic groups, Leger Marketing conducted a survey of people throughout the country. The poll was conducted in early October and surveyed 1,500 Canadians including 1,000 Quebeckers.

By Arthur Weinreb - Monday, October 22, 2007

Chalk one up for David Miller

For those who care about such matters, Toronto City Council is set to vote on Mayor David Miller’s controversial new tax initiatives, or as the mayor likes to call them “revenue generating tools”, today.  While most of Toronto’s punditocracy are hedging their bets by claiming the vote is too close to call, you can take this to the bank: the new taxes will be in effect at the end of tonight’s council meeting.

By Klaus Rohrich - Monday, October 22, 2007

Beyond statism and sustainability

Stephane Dion likes to characterize himself as a man of integrity and intellectual rigour. But the Liberal Party he leads is certainly not characterized by these traits. And we are not writing here of AdScam.

By Beryl Wajsman - Monday, October 22, 2007

Is Huckabee the Next Reagan…

Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee has seized on an issue—U.S. sovereignty—that could not only win him the Republican nomination for president but propel him into the White House.

By Cliff Kincaid - Monday, October 22, 2007

Liberals Want Quick Vote on U.N. Treaty

In new developments concerning the U.N.‘s Law of the Sea Treaty, the Senate Foreign Relations Committee had scheduled a quick vote on the pact for next Wednesday, October 24. But a member of the committee, Senator David Vitter, has reportedly requested—and received—a postponement of the vote. Vitter has been in the forefront of exposing the dangerous provisions of the measure.

By Cliff Kincaid - Monday, October 22, 2007

Blowing the Whistle on U.N. Corruption

On the eve of a Senate vote on the U.N.‘s Law of the Sea Treaty, a former senior staffer in one of the key institutions created by the treaty says that U.S. senators should have the complete and honest truth about mismanagement and financial corruption there. The International Seabed Authority, which is one of the main organizations created by the treaty, stands to receive millions of U.S. taxpayer dollars if the Senate ratifies the pact.

By Cliff Kincaid - Monday, October 22, 2007

Hey Al Gore, We Want a Refund

A British judge ruled on the eve of Al Gore co-winning the Nobel Peace Prize that students forced to watch “An Inconvenient Truth” must be warned of the film’s factual errors. But would there be any science at all left in Gore’s “truth” if these errors and their progeny were excised?

By Steve Milloy - Monday, October 22, 2007

Your Heart Is Slowly Dying From Chronic Scurvy

Why is research that could save countless lives unknown to Canadian and U.S. doctors?  This week, a report that Dr. Sydney Bush, an optometrist in Hull, England, has made an historic discovery. He claims that atherosclerosis (hardening of arteries) can be reversed. And his research, which could save millions from heart attack, should have made headlines around the world.

By Dr. Gifford Jones - Sunday, October 21, 2007

Bob Jones Dances With The Devil

The Washington Times carried an Associated Press report entitled, “Bob Jones III endorses Mitt Romney.” Here are excerpts:

By Guest Column Chuck Baldwin- Sunday, October 21, 2007

The Top Internet Security Screw Ups

With over 14 years experience of defending against Internet Security threats, Brent MacLean, Managing Director of J.B. MacLean Consulting Inc., has seen it all. The top ten Internet security screw ups. So here they are, in reverse order (saving the best to last):

By Guest Column Brent MacLean- Sunday, October 21, 2007

The Bird Brain Flu Epidemic

Progressives around the world and more specifically in the USA have unilaterally decided that the election of November 2006 was a mandate for their Socialist agendas.

By Guest Column Malcolm Hedges- Sunday, October 21, 2007

Shep still waiting for the train

image  No matter how icy the winds that will howl into your hometown come winter,  there’s a lasting warmth to be found in a new book called Shep: Loyalty Beyond All Bounds by Kevin Davis.

  The Shep story was 65 years in coming and worth every second of waiting.

  Sixty-five years ago in Ft. Benton, Montana a sheepdog named Shep died.  But Shep who had wandered into the human heart was never to be forgotten, not even generations later.

  In any kind of weather Shep went up to every passenger train that stopped in his hometown—for five and one-half years, where he waited patiently for his beloved master’s return.

When Shep died in 1942, the story hit the A.P.  It was picked up by the London Daily and the New York Times.  At that time,  it took on meaning for those who would grieve the departure of their loves ones (those who were bravely departing for WW2) and would wait while hoping and praying for the joyous day of their return.

By Judi McLeod - Saturday, October 20, 2007

El Rushbo Uses Letter from Useful Idiots to Help U.S. Troops

Harry Reid and forty of the most fervently anti-American Democrats in the history of the U.S. Senate tried their level best to embarrass conservative talk show icon Rush Limbaugh, while simultaneously promoting themselves as guardian angels charged with protecting U.S. troops.

By John Lillpop - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Top Ten Frivolous Lawsuits

We’ve all heard the one about the woman who spilled scalding coffee and successfully sued McDonald’s. But we’ve also heard reports of burglars suing homeowners after injuring themselves during a robbery. And don’t forget the stories of Winnebago owners winning lawsuits after they left the driver’s seat because the vehicle’s cruise control was activated. Most of us laugh off these stories as urban legends made to show the absurdity of frivolous lawsuits. You might be surprised, however, by how many of these are true.

By Guest Column - Saturday, October 20, 2007


ABC Tries To Credit Democrats for Rush’s $2 Million Ebay Letter!

imageIf this doesn’t take the cake, I don’t know what does? On an ABC News Blog called the Political Radar, ABC reports on Rush Limbaugh’s $2 million condemnation letter and throughout the piece continually links “Democrats” to the charity donation that Limbaugh and the ebay bidder for the letter are giving the money to.

After reading this ABC blog report, one gets the sneaking suspicion that ABC thinks that Harry Reid and the Democrats are the ones that should be hailed as the good guys responsible for raising this monumental sum for charity. It is clear that ABC did their level best to play down Limbaugh’s part in the story and play up the supposed positive contribution of Democrats.

By Warner Todd Huston - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Chicago Sneaks Free Newspaper Killing Law into Effect

Today, thanks to a law ushered in the back door right under everyone’s noses, it is illegal to distribute free newspapers. Were the Founders alive today, Richard Daley, King of Chicago, would prevent them from distributing their political papers to the public. No speech in King Daley’s city… not without HIS say-so, anyway.

By Warner Todd Huston - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Naomi Wolf Cries Fascism

One of my pet peeves with the Left is the tendency, almost by default, to liken the Bush Administration to Adolf Hitler and the Nazis. It is a significant reason I could no longer bring myself to associate with the Left.

By Guest Column Aaron Goldstein- Saturday, October 20, 2007

Feds and North Carolina Sheriffs Work Together to Capture Criminal Aliens

US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) representatives today presented a proposed statewide partnership plan to the sheriffs in attendance at the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Association’s (NCSA) fall meeting. This is the first in many conversations between federal and local officers aimed at affording every area of North Carolina increased use of the unique authorities of ICE.

By Jim Kouri - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Afghan Drug Kingpin Baz Mohammad Extradited to New York

Baz Mohammad, 51, an Afghan heroin kingpin who is the first defendant ever extradited to the US from Afghanistan, was sentenced this week to 16 years imprisonment for managing an international narcotics-trafficking organization that imported millions of dollars of heroin into the US, according to the US Attorney’s Office in New York City.

By Jim Kouri - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Question: Did the Resolution Condemning Turkey Create a Constitutional Crisis

Recently, the House Foreign Affairs Committee, chaired by US Rep. Tom Lantos (D-CA), passed a resolution that recognized the killing of up to 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks in 1915 as genocide. While the circumstances surrounding the slaughter are disputed, the killings did occur. The larger questions this action presents could very well be as disturbing as the killings themselves. What was there to gain by issuing this non-binding resolution at this moment in time? And, did the issuance of the non-binding resolution usurp the Executive Branch’s authority to establish foreign policy?

By Frank Salvato - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Of Nobel Frauds, Murderers and Knaves

By winning the coveted Nobel Peace Prize last week, Al Gore has become one of truly select company. To put this accomplishment in perspective, it will be instructive to briefly review the achievements of some of the Prize’s earlier recipients.

By Vasko Kohlmayer Jr. - Saturday, October 20, 2007

Fake Male Syndrome is on the way out

There’s good news within the popular and consumer culture.  “Metrosexual” is out “menergy” is in. For those who aren’t familiar with the term “metrosexual” it applies to testosterone challenged, narcissistic, heterosexual males whose primary focus is on their physical appearance.

By Guest Column Marsha West- Saturday, October 20, 2007

Musharraf’s respect for press freedom

Although many are skeptical about Pakistani President General Pervez Musharraf’s commitment to democracy, even they agree the press has had more freedom under him than probably ever before. Even so, the press there walks a careful line through a minefield of military, political and religious influences.

By Guest Column Salah Uddin Shoaib Choudhury- Saturday, October 20, 2007

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